Residents won’t be silenced

By on October 16, 2014

Neighbors who live near Rock Lititz  expressed fears at a June Warwick Township Supervisors meeting that the rock-rehearsal building would effect their quality of life.

Rock Lititz kicked off the opening of its state-of-the-art rehearsal studio last month. The company announced Wednesday the building 52,000-sq.-ft., 100-foot-high facility has been shut down until further notice.

Rock Lititz kicked off the opening of its state-of-the-art rehearsal studio last month. The company announced Wednesday the 52,000-sq.-ft., 100-foot-high facility has been shut down until further notice.

Warwick Township Board of Supervisors tonight (Wednesday) will likely rehash that theme from its June 18 meeting where residents sought assurances that Rock Lititz would not be an annoyance.

Back then, homeowners voiced concerns about loud noise from testing. Now, the focus is on low-frequency vibrations.

Over the past two weeks, police have received dozens of complaints over concerns for property value, personal health, and peace of mind related to the recently opened studio. Neighbors will now bring these concerns to supervisors and Rock Lititz representatives, who so far have not disclosed how they will fix the problem.

In June residents asked the board what would happen if noise levels rose to unacceptable levels at Rock Lititz.

Board Chairman Logan Myers stated that Rock Lititz companies “are not different and there are ordinances that pertain to noise, and if there are violations, our ordinances will be enforced whether it is a home or business.”

But Dan Zimmerman, Warwick Township manager, said Tuesday there’s no noise ordinance in place and the board will consider a proposal Wednesday from a consultant to help draft one.

It is not clear whether soundproofing plans were completed on the towering, black, 52,000-square-foot, $7 million studio.

Supervisors in June said a “substantial buffer” was part of the floodplain restoration project. The watershed improvement project, which would provide a large swath of vegetation, was planned to go into place when the project received approval from Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Residents were told that existing vegetation on Clair Global’s property would remain and be supplemented by an eight-foot-high earth berm, along with 300 to 400 feet of planted forested area.

Rock Lititz officials refused to discuss the sound-proofing issues Tuesday, but promised to have an official at Wednesday’s meeting, though the subject is not officially on the agenda.

Andrea Shirk, general manager at Rock Lititz, issued this statement Tuesday: “Rock Lititz is focused on finding the optimal method to better contain and control the vibrational sound that is impacting its neighbors.”

During the summer, the company said painstaking land-management processes were aimed to assure the environmental health before, during and after the completion of one-million-square-foot, pre-tour rehearsal center.

The Rock Lititz Studio is the first phase of the campus that is part of an eight-step process on a 17-acre floodplain restoration project that includes relocating and maintaining 3,136 feet of the Santo Domingo creek.

The project calls for removing 55,371 cubic yards of fill from the floodway of the creek and installing five 30-foot-long elliptical concrete pipes that are four-feet high and over six-feet wide.

Patrick Burns is a staff writer for the Lititz Record Express. He welcomes your questions and comments and can be reached at pburns.eph@lnpnews.com or at 721-4455.

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