MC Art Show doubles in size

By on April 6, 2016
Guests at the Manheim Central Art Show opening reception examine the artwork on display (Photos by Rochelle Shenk)

Guests at the Manheim Central Art Show opening reception examine the artwork on display (Photos by Rochelle Shenk)

 

Manheim Central’s two-day Art Show was certainly a success. The opening reception March 17 at the Farm Show Exhibition Center drew an estimated 500 area residents, while the March 18 show was visited by numerous classes from through the district.

The event was made possible by a MCFEE (Manheim Central Foundation for Educational Enrichment) grant.

Coordinated by Manheim Central High School art teachers Dan Cook and Bob Hughes, the event featured 500 works of art &tstr; both two-dimensional and three-dimensional &tstr; from students in grades K to 12. The opening reception also featured live music from members of Paper Avenue, a self-described alternative rock group, and refreshments from the district’s food services department.

“We had a lot of support from school administrators for this exhibit,” Cook said. “Additionally the Manheim Community Farm Show donated the use of the exhibition center. It’s large and open, and located right next to the high school so it’s a perfect place for the exhibit.”

The opening drew parents, grandparents, teachers, administrators and other guests. Students could be seen steering parents and grandparents toward their artwork or artwork created by their classmates or friends.

“It’s a beautiful show. It’s hard to believe all the talent that’s in our district,” said Miriam Nachbar, whose granddaughter attends H. C. Burgard Elementary.

She said that although her granddaughter’s artwork was not part of the exhibit, her granddaughter urged her to attend the show to see the work of her classmates.

Nazarii Blanchard examines a piece of art on display at the Manheim Central Art Show.

Nazarii Blanchard examines a piece of art on display at the Manheim Central Art Show.

 

Nazarii Blanchard was also enthusiastic about the variety of artwork.

“It’s art, and I love it,” he said as he examined the works on display, sometimes discussing art techniques with other guests.

Members of Manheim Central High School’s National Art Honor Society greeted guests at the door and circulated throughout the exhibit providing information. During Friday’s visits from classes, they were also on-hand to provide information to students. They worked alongside of Cook and Hughes to hang the exhibit, sorting the artwork that was received from the art teachers in each school, making labels and determining placement of each piece.

Manheim Central National Art Honor Society president Cassandra Edwards, a senior, said that she draws on her own experiences to creating art. She focuses on oil and pastel portraits and ceramic pots, some of which were part of the exhibit. She’s also working on a book that combines her original photos and free-form poetry.

 

Scott Johnson (left) and Christian Smith (right) part of the alternative rock band Paper Avenue perform at Manheim Central Art Show opening reception.

Scott Johnson (left) and Christian Smith (right) part of the alternative rock band Paper Avenue perform at Manheim Central Art Show opening reception.

 

Quentin Brendel, a senior and the organization’s treasurer, focuses on sculpture, but also enjoys creating paintings. His love of science fiction could be seen in the “weeping angel” sculpture that was part of the exhibit. “Doctor Who” fans will be familiar with “weeping angels” &tstr; predatory creatures resembling stone statues. Brendel’s sculpture drew some interest from fans of the popular show as well as people with friends who are fans.

National Art Honor Society member and high school junior Ashlee Herr’s favored medium is ceramics. She said that she works with a glaze that adds texture and dimension to her pieces. During the exhibit she explained her technique.

This is the second year for the district-wide exhibit. Cook said that last year’s exhibit featured about 300 pieces of artwork from nearly 225 students. This year’s show not only featured more artwork &tstr; 500 pieces &tstr; but also more students &tstr; about 250 &tstr; were represented. “

It’s a great opportunity for the community to see a bit of what’s going on in the schools,” Hughes said.

He explained that the exhibit has evolved. It started out several years ago as a senior exhibit for National Art Society members. He said that because seniors are pretty busy in the spring and there’s so much else going on at that time, it morphed into a high school show and then into a district wide show.

 

Manheim Central National Art Honor Society members Cassandra Edwards (left) and Ashlee Herr (right) sort through the 500 pieces of artwork for the Manheim Central Art Show prior to hanging them for the exhibit.

Manheim Central National Art Honor Society members Cassandra Edwards (left) and Ashlee Herr (right) sort through the
500 pieces of artwork for the Manheim Central Art Show prior to hanging them for the exhibit.

 

“The neatest thing is that younger students can see what goes on in upper grades,” Cook said.

“We also hope that it inspires younger students to become interested in art,” Hughes added.

Rochelle Shenk is a correspondent for the Lititz Record Express. She welcomes your comments and questions at RAASHENK@aol.com.

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