Artist’s Alley showcases glassblowing, restored railroad station, local art

By on July 6, 2016
Guests at Artist’s Alley view some of the hand-blown glass items for sale by Stiegel Glassworks 1976

Guests at Artist’s Alley view some of the hand-blown glass items for sale by Stiegel Glassworks 1976

 

Hosted by Stiegel Glassworks 1976 and Manheim Historical Society on June 12, Artist’s Alley showcased the works of local artisans and the restored railroad station at 210 S. Charlotte St.

Guests could ride the Historical Society’s restored 1926 Birney trolley, check out a restored 1917 cabin car (caboose), and explore the train station and its exhibits. They could also watch Stiegel Glassworks glassblowers demonstrate their craft, enjoy freshly roasted peanuts and browse artwork from area artists.

One of the artists was 11-year-old Amelia Kresge. The proceeds from sales of her original art will be donated to the Wolf Sanctuary of Pennsylvania, located near Speedwell Forge, Lititz. The seventh grade student said that she likes drawing, and her favorite medium is pencil and paper, but she also likes acrylics.

“It seems like I’ve loved to draw my whole life,” she said.

 

Amelia Kresge with her artwork at Artist’s Alley. Proceeds of the sale of her work will be donated to the Wolf Sanctuary of Pennsylvania. (Photos by Rochelle Shenk)

Amelia Kresge with her artwork at Artist’s Alley. Proceeds of the sale of her work will be donated to the Wolf Sanctuary of Pennsylvania. (Photos by Rochelle Shenk)

 

She’s inspired by nature.

“A few years ago I started going to art galleries and museums to see other artist’s works. That’s helped me define my style and subject matter,” Kresge explained, “I love the Impressionists, especially Claude Monet and his water lily series.”

A family visit to the Wolf Sanctuary earlier this year struck a chord with her. The Wolf Sanctuary of Pennsylvania was originally created 30 years ago as private rescue for wolves. Today it not only is haven for these animals, but it has grown into an educational facility.

“I really admire the way they care for the wolves,” Kresge said. So she decided to use her first foray into public art shows and sales of her artwork to support the sanctuary’s effort.

Kresge’s parents, Brian and Leah, are supportive of her artwork and her fundraising effort.

“When I do a painting, my mom posts it on social media,” Amelia said.

To view Kresge’s artwork, visit Facebook.com/artbyAmeliaLK.

Bea Kreiner, Manheim Historical Society curator, pointed out that the organization is hosting open house activities at the railroad station from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sundays through September, and that includes rides on the trolley, weather permitting. The organization’s Fasig House, a replica of an 18th century German log home that houses Colonial-era artifacts, and the Keath House, an original 18th century log home, are open 2 to 4 p.m. Sundays through August. Both houses sit side-by-side at 30 and 32 E. High St. They back into the public parking lot off N. Wolf St.

Artist’s Alley had previously been held several times during the year. However Stiegel Glassworks spokesperson Len Bodnar said that the June event may be the only one for this year.

“If we do have another Artist’s Alley this year, it would be sometime in the fall,” he said, adding that the glass studio is open periodically for glassblowing demonstrations.

For the glass studio hours or future Artist’s Alley details, call Stiegel Glassworks at 940-1382.

Rochelle Shenk is a correspondent for the Lititz Record Express. She welcomes your comments and questions at RAASHENK@aol.com.

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