Warwick gets upgrades

By on August 6, 2014
This new eight-lane, all-weather track was completed around the Grosh Stadium turf field by the end of July.

This new eight-lane, all-weather track was completed around the Grosh Stadium turf field by the end of July.

When Warwick’s student-athletes return to campus this fall, they will notice some big improvements to the school’s facilities.
During the summer months, upgrades were made to the Warriors’ weight room and an eight-lane all-weather track was added inside Grosh Stadium.
As Warwick Athletic Director Ryan Landis noted, both projects represent significant upgrades and they were accomplished without breaking the bank.
“We’re not talking about trying to make this the greatest weight room in the country,” Landis said. “What we’re trying to do is provide the best environment for our student-athletes and our phys ed students where they have the facilities they deserve to use at a very fiscally responsible rate.”
The cost for the weight room improvements, which included adding three state-of-the-art treadmills and a 24-foot rig with four incline benches, was less than $15,000. The new pieces of equipment, while being safe and sturdy, are all refurbished items, and the funds were earmarked in the budget to be spent on the weight room.

The weight room at Warwick High School recently received an upgrade in its equipment, with three new state-of-the-art treadmills and a 24-foot rig with four incline benches being added.

The weight room at Warwick High School recently received an upgrade
in its equipment, with three new state-of-the-art treadmills and a 24-foot rig with four incline benches being added.

“We didn’t buy brand new anything,” Landis said. “We took away a lot of costs that would have been involved if we spray painted and had everything certain colors. We really tried to keep the costs down and we were very successful in doing that … One of the things we wanted to do was get it in under the 2013-14 budget because there was money set aside to address it. So we were going to get all this done at a reasonable price without it affecting the budget moving forward, which was another plus for us.”
Landis said there was equipment in the weight room that was out-of-date and safety concerns were a big motivation for the upgrades.
“When I presented (plans) to the (student activity committee), when you start talking about safety, that opens eyes and people say, ‘Let’s get this done,’” he said. “We went through the channels and I think it’s very fair, reasonably-priced high quality products that we’re putting in the weight room.”
The process started with coaches and physical education teachers at Warwick offering feedback about the weight room and its needs, and then Landis working with business manager Nate Wertsch. From there, Warwick got bids in the later winter/early spring time period and reviewed different options. In the end, Christian’s Fitness Factory in Lancaster blew them away with its plan.
“What we wanted to do is provide a more up-to-date, safe weight room and fitness room,” Landis said. “As is the case with other areas of a building, when you have an area such as that weight room, you have to stay on top of it &tstr; update things, maintenance, procedures so that it remains a safe environment.”
The environment inside Grosh Stadium will be different with the addition of an all-weather track, which was completed at the end of July by Lancaster Asphalt Systems.
“The only thing it affected was the off-season,” said Landis, noting that the Warriors’ football, field hockey and soccer teams worked out on other areas of the campus for a month during the summer.
The macadam base for the all-weather track was put down in the summer of 2010, at the same time that the turf field was installed at Grosh Stadium.
“That was done expecting to do this down the road,” said Tom Becker, who is Warwick’s director of buildings and grounds.
Installing a black track, as opposed to a red one, made sense for Warwick for a couple of reasons.
“It’s the exact same track, whether it’s black or red,” Becker said. “Red rubber costs more than black rubber does, so it was less expensive to do it that way, but yet it’s the exact same thing. And we thought it just looked good going around the whole (stadium) with the black end zone.”

 

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