Hohman signs with Monmouth

By on April 26, 2017
Warwick senior Ryan Hohman signed his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday, April 12 to attend Division-One Monmouth University, where he will continue his swimming and academic careers.
Warwick senior Ryan Hohman signed his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday, April 12 to attend Division-One Monmouth University, where he will continue his swimming and academic careers.

Warwick senior Ryan Hohman signed his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday, April 12 to attend Division-One Monmouth University, where he will continue his swimming and academic careers.

The men’s swimming program at Monmouth University is building from the ground up.

The sport was reintroduced at the West Long Branch, N.J. campus in 2015-16, and when the Hawks faced Fordham and Fairfield in the pool during October of that season, it was their first meet in 32 years.

This past winter, Monmouth took a step forward at the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) Championships in mid-February, adding 7 1/2 points to its finish from a year earlier.

Recently, the Hawks gained another boost, as Warwick senior Ryan Hohman signed his National Letter of Intent to continue his swimming and academic careers at Monmouth.

“It’s a new program and they’re really focused on continuing to get better and improving and I really liked that,” said Hohman, a PIAA State qualifier this March and a three-time District Three participant.

Monmouth University was actually the last of four college campuses that he visited, on the heels of the University of Delaware, Arcadia University, Salisbury University and Ithaca College.

UD, where family members of Hohman attended, had the inside track up until then. But after mulling it over, he opted for the Hawks and signed his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday, April 12.

Penn Manor’s Tyler Lutter, a teammate/friend from the Diplomat Swim Club, will also be attending Monmouth.

“I had to think about it a lot,” said Hohman, who plans to major in biology and pursuing a career in physical therapy. “But Monmouth is a smaller school and I feel like it gave me the better opportunity as a swimmer and as a student.”

Hawks’ skipper Matt Nunnally, who has coached at the Division-One level for 20 years, including 15 at LaSalle University where he led the men’s and women’s teams to a No. 21 ranking in the Mid-Major Division One polls in 2008-09, left a positive impression on Hohman as well.

“I just thought (Monmouth) had the best package and the team was really cool, I got along with everyone on my overnight there, and the coach, Matt Nunnally, has a lot of good experience,” Hohman said, “and I just figured he could help me continue to get better through my next four years.”

Based upon the times that Hohman has already posted, Nunnally believes he could potentially score right away in the MAAC.

“Very excited,” Nunnally said when asked about his reaction to signing Hohman. “We’re into our third season, so we’re still in the process of building our program, but Ryan’s a guy that’s going to come in and really help us in terms of our mid-distance and distance freestyle — someone that can really come in and have an immediate impact in our program … I would anticipate that we’re going to see him swim faster next year and really make an impact in the MAAC.”

Just this year alone, Monmouth’s skipper likes the potential and improvement that Hohman has shown.

“Physically, (Ryan) looks like a guy who’s going to fill out and get stronger and continue to grow,” Nunnally said. “I think just the potential that he’s shown in terms of the improvement that he’s made over the course of the year and and getting to know him over time and having him here on campus, we just thought he’d be a great fit in our Conference and also with our team.”

Hohman will compete in the 200 free, 500 free and 400 Individual Medley for the Hawks. In March, he claimed an eighth-place District medal in the 200 free in 1:44.20 and just missed taking home hardware in the 500 free, finishing ninth in 4:48.70.

He also joined Cade and Keir Uhlin and Oliver Lance on the eighth-place 400 free relay in 3:15.76.

“I was happy because freshman and sophomore years, I was just kinda getting into it,” Hohman said, “but last year and this year, I had good years, so I was really happy.”

The 200 free, he acknowledges, is probably the stronger of his events. Hohman has also competed in the 1,000 and mile with the Diplomat Club, though they wouldn’t be classified his favorites.

“I don’t really like those events that much,” he smiled, “but if I got asked to do it, I’d do it.”

By comparison, the 200 free and 500 free are considered sprints. Over the years, Hohman also has done the 50 and 100 to improve his speed.

“If you talk to other swimmers,” Hohman said, “they might say it’s a distance event, but if you talk to a 500 swimmer, they’re going to say it feels like a sprint because that’s how it’s kinda evolved today.”

At Monmouth, Hohman would love for his career to evolve where he can reach the NCAA’s.

“Ultimately, the dream goal I guess would be to make (that),” Hohman said. “But realistically, I want to place at Conferences in the MAAC and just get as many points as I can and medal as many times as I can through my career.”

In other words, Hohman wants to be a building block for the young Monmouth program.

“I just like the idea of trying to build a new dynasty in a program like that,” he said, “and they’re headed in a good direction. I’m pumped.”

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